Individual Differences in Anthropomorphism Questionnaire (IDAQ)


A dictionary to be used with LIWC that can assess frequency of words related to mind perception

Next, we will ask you to rate the extent to which you believe various stimuli (e.g. technological or mechanical items, wild and domestic animals, and natural things) possess certain capacities. On a 0-10 scale (where 0 = “Not at All” and 10 = “Very much”), please rate the extent to which the stimulus possesses the capacity given. Please circle a number to indicate your response.

We will ask you about the extent to which the stimulus has a mind of its own, has free will, has intentions, has consciousness, can experience emotions, is good-looking, is durable, is lethargic, is active, and is useful.

By “has a mind of its own” we mean able to do what it wants.
By “has free will” we mean able to choose and control its own actions.
By “has intentions” we mean has preferences and plans.
By “can experience emotion” we mean it has feelings.
By “has consciousness” we mean able to be aware of itself and its thoughts and feelings.
By “good-looking” we mean attractive.
By “lethargic” we mean moving slowly.
By “active” we mean moving frequently and quickly.
By “useful” we mean able to be used for something.

1. To what extent is the desert lethargic?
2. To what extent is the average computer active?
3. To what extent does technology—devices and machines for manufacturing, entertainment, and productive processes (e.g. cars, computers, television sets)—have intentions.
4. To what extent does the average fish have free will.
5. To what extent is the average cloud good-looking.
6. To what extent are pets useful?
7. To what extent does the average mountain have free will?
8. To what extent is the average amphibian lethargic?
9. To what extent does a television set experience emotions?
10. To what extent is the average robot good-looking?
11. To what extent does the average robot have consciousness.
12. To what extent do cows have intentions?
13. To what extent does a car have free will?
14. To what extent does the ocean have consciousness?
15. To what extent is the average camera lethargic?
16. To what extent is a river useful?
17. To what extent does the average computer have a mind of its own.
18. To what extent is a tree active?
19. To what extent is the average kitchen appliance useful?
20. To what extent does a cheetah experience emotions?
21. To what extent does the environment experience emotions?
22. To what extent does the average insect have a mind of its own?
23. To what extent does a tree have a mind of its own?
24. To what extent is technology—devices and machines for manufacturing, entertainment, and productive processes (e.g. cars, computers, television sets)—durable?
25. To what extent is the average cat active.
26. To what extent does the wind have intentions?
27. To what extent is the forest durable?
28. To what extent is a tortoise durable?
29. To what extent does the average reptile have consciousness?
30. To what extent is the average dog good-looking?


Instructions to Experimenters

Participants respond to each of the items using an 11-point scale (Not at All=0, Very Much=10). This measure includes the IDAQ score (that assesses anthropomorphism) and the IDAQ-NA (that assesses non-anthropomorphic attribution). To compute the IDAQ response score, sum items 3, 4, 7, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 20, 21, 22, 23, 26, 29. To compute IDAQ-NA, sum items 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 10, 15, 16, 18, 19, 24, 25, 27, 28, 30.


Reference for Further Details

Waytz, A., Cacioppo, J., & Epley, N. (2010). Who sees human? The stability and importance of individual differences in anthropomorphism. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 5(3), 219-232.